Story Collection

#CitizenshipForAllAdoptees

Monte Haines gives insight and untold struggles of what it means to live as an adoptee without citizenship and his personal reflections.

Monte, an adoptee without citizenship who was deported by the American government from an interview with SBS.Monte, Iowa. A veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces found out he was without citizenship after a series of events, resulting in deportation.

Monte’s interview with SBS is available on YouTube: youtube.com/watch?v=0s3PC-oDBGg.


Monte Haines was born in 1970 in South Korea and was sent for adoption to a family in Iowa in 1978 through Holt International on an IR-4 visa as an Unseen Orphan to be Adopted. His adoption was never finalized, and then Monte was again relinquished. He bounced around between several foster homes before he was legally adopted by his parents in 1981. Although he served in the U.S. military from ‘93-’96, he was arrested on charges for a crime he was set up for and did not intentionally commit. He subsequently served three years in a county jail and prison. Afterwards, he was detained and spent two years in a detention center.

According to what Monte understood, his adoptive parents already believed he was naturalized. His family was never contacted by the US Government to ensure his adoption was finalized, which included completion of the naturalization process. His adoption agency also failed to ensure that he was naturalized.

Monte still has his mother, friends, and community living in the United States. Unless the Child Citizenship Act of 2000 is amended, he is permanently barred from reentering into the United States. He says, “I would love to go back and go in front of the Congress and explain about what needs to be changed.”

Monte and other veterans need your help to be heard.

  1. Share #CitizenshipForAllAdoptees and sign a Postcard
  2. Donate online
  3. Share your story as an adoptee without citizenship (or spouse/parent/child of an adoptee lacking citizenship) who served as part of the US Armed Forces. Email adopteedefense@gmail.com or submit online
  4. Call or write a letter to lawmakers. November 11 is Veterans’ Day
  5. RSVP to Join the Advocacy Day, scheduled for Thursday 12/01 – Friday Nov 12/02

Are you or your family members veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces, and appalled for Monte? Send legislators a personal message on an ePostcard today!

Share your own story (adoptees without citizenship, parent(s) of adoptee(s) without citizenship, spouses and children of adoptees without citizenship, etc) Email adopteedefense@gmail.com (Please write “Story Collection” in the Subject line).

Note: Remember to spread the word via social media using the #citizenshipforalladoptees

*Name changed to protect privacy.

For more information, email us at adopteedefense@gmail.com.

Monte

Updated on 2016-11-07T11:20:06+00:00, by Adoptee Rights Campaign.